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Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Culturally, historically, environmentally significant Marinduque

1997 Teatro Balangaw production of Mara Unduk.
Photo by Mel Cortez published in BusinessWorld

Thirteen years ago (2005), I posted a blog in my old website about Marinduque's historical and cultural significance, reposted below as a lookback on how this blog (after more than 2-million pageviews), came into being for perusal of the world outside. There was immediately a brief but encouraging response from a certain 'John G' who lived abroad that I published this in return, later reinforced by an email from another reader (also reproduced below):

Yeah, 'John G' thanks! I guess it's different when you often find yourself in the midst of it all. SEE troubles brewing everywhere and watch how people merely LOOK at what transpires around through rose-colored glasses, or through dollar-rimmed ones or not look at all and pretend to be blind.
Based on electronic 'impulses' of the last few days (a few emails reaching me that is), there's putting forward of 'strong advocacy work' in the matter of turning Marinduque into a center for excellence in tropical mining and as eco-tourism ground. I could only support these views with the following cultural viewpoint from my side that couldn't be, mustn't be, brushed aside if we are to step forward in the right direction:

Ancient Marinduque finds. Photo: Musee du quai Branly
Old Marinduque
It must be stressed that the beginnings of archaeology in the Philippines began right here in our now-troubled island. Prior to 1900, only one important archaeological investigation had been carried out in the country: Alfred Marche’s exploration of Marinduque from April to July 1881.
While many other accidental finds have been recorded from time to time, and a few burial caves and sites had been casually explored by European or local scientists, no really systematic work had been done elsewhere prior to that except for the efforts of Marche. After his, the next important work was by Dr. Carl Gunthe in the Central Visayan Islands in 1922.(Beyer)
"An abundant yield of Chinese urns, vases, gold ornaments, skulls and other ornaments of pre-Spanish origin,” was what Marche's finds represented. He brought back to France in 40 crates the artifacts he uncovered. They are now said to be housed at the Musee de l’Homme in France. (Solheim).
The finds also included a wooden image of the Marinduque anito called ‘Pastores’ by the natives. (Marche's local adventure was tackled in my 1995 play: 'Moryonan: Ikalawang Yugto' and I still keep a replica of the anito for stage productions).
Ambeth Ocampo, chairman of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), conducted a research a few years back and discovered that part of the Marche loots had found their way into the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He wrote thus:
“Imagine these fragile jarlets traveling from China to the pre-colonial Philippines. Buried in a cave in Marinduque for centuries, they were excavated in the late 19th century, brought to Paris and eventually ended up in a museum bodega outside Washington, D.C. Part of our history lies in museums abroad and it will take sometime to analyze these artifacts to piece together our pre-colonial past”. (The Philippines' pre-colonial history, that is; and it shows what happens if we keep looking the other way!)
Young Moryonan fan in Torrijos, Marinduque

   National artists drawn to Marinduque
Cultural researchers and national artists (and probably even you, yourself, John G), had been naturally drawn to Marinduque for here, there's undeniable certainty that they'd find what inspiration or ‘that something, something’ they were looking for. Alejandro Roces (Literature) discovered the Moryonan (though he must assume responsibility for introducing it wrongly to the outside world as 'Moriones'); Lucresia Kasilag (Music), found the Putong ritual and songs (or Tubong as it is called in Boac) and replaced it with a shorter version that eventually became popular to the defeat of around 80 or so 'unglorified' versions that the natives used to sing on the island at any given day; Celso Carunungan intervened to write a script for the Pugutan beheading ritual because to use his own words “it was meaningless”. Arsenio Manuel wrote a detailed account of the 'Marinduque' name’s origin. (He's also a national artist, you know).
Marinduque is central to Pedro Murillo's 1734 map.

Modern national forms of speech have sprung from Marinduque Tagalog
There were a few, staunchly pro-Marinduqueno: Cecilio Lopez, acclaimed Father of Philippine Linguistics got thrilled with the Tagalog spoken here, for “such provincial forms of speech have been originally the roots, or among the roots, from which modern national forms have spung” - the Filipino language we speak today in the urban centers. In Marinduque we could find “remnants of the more archaic speech of our forefathers”, he wrote conclusively.
Even the acclaimed British-writer James Hamilton-Paterson discovered this "stunningly beautiful world" of sand and offshore reefs where he learned his Tagalog and came to love the people. Since 1979, he has lived off and on in “enforced solitude” in a makeshift shelter, teaching himself to spear fish for food, then writing about his adventures here the book became one of his biggest best-sellers. (“Playing with Water” has sold more than 4-million copies).
Recent studies conducted by cultural anthropologists Patricia Nicholson on the negative effects of politics on ‘Moryonan’, and by Catherine Coumans on the struggle of poor Calancan Bay fisherfolks against mine waste disposal on their fishing grounds accounted for the systematic advance of cultural and political degradation on the island.
Teatro Balangaw production of Labanan sa Pulang Lupa,
written and directed by this blogger

Unsung local revolutionary heroes of Marinduque
Then we have to be reminded of days when fighting for and dying for Marinduque was considered glorious and not anachronistic. The Marinduqueno’s struggle for independence from Spanish rule saw the first declaration of freedom from Spain by Martin Lardizabal a month before the Kawit declaration was made; the fierce resistance against the American rule in the 1900s where local revolutionaries led by Maximo Abad underscored the first major battle won by Filipinos at Pulang Lupa; the united resistance against the Japanese during World War II which dramatically exploded on the feast day of its Patroness – all attest to the strong sense of cultural identity and striving for peace and freedom that our Marinduqueno forefathers held, don't you think?
Open pit mining in Marinduque

Destruction
Martial rule and the negative side of local politics, greed and selfishness, complacency and the Marcopper mining disasters of 1993 (Mogpog) and 1996 (Boac) not to mentioned the decades of pollution in Calancan Bay, have impacted on our lives and on our environment, wreaking untold misery and endless manipulation, so certainly dividing our people now even under further threat of a new armed conflict.
All of these are adversely affecting that which we hold most dear to us, threatening to get them buried beneath tonnes and more tonnes of toxic waste as our country's singular and toxic legacy to Marinduque, what could be our only tool left for salvation: Our cultural significance to the Filipino nation!
“Heart of the Philippines” we love to say of Marinduque. Makes sense, doesn't it? Yet the will to change, the vow to assert ourselves as a people can only come first from the very Heart. The Marinduqueno’s Heart.
Got to do it, 'John G'!
Mining spill. Destruction and death of the Boac River, the second river in Marinduque to have suffered the same fate. Still a struggle 22 years later.

(There was an email response to the above article that, I am sure triggered, somewhat, something inside me to just keep aflame that Marinduque fire:
"Hi Eli: I very much enjoyed reading your cultural piece on Marinduque. And to hear where Ambeth is now. I first met him at Cornell but had been reading his columns for years.
Your piece resurrected for me some of the sense of history and magic I felt when I lived in Marinduque - when the roads beyond Mogpog was not yet paved, there were so few personal cars on the island that they were known individually by who owned or drove them.
I have almost forgotten that joyful feeling of being in a special place over the years now of solidarity struggle for justice over the damage done by Placer Dome. Very soul sapping on the whole.
But the raiding of Marinduque's cultural treasures was going on at the same time as her natural treasures were being raided even as I lived there. While I was in Marinduque a Ming dynasty era wreck was found near Tres Reyes and trust me, not all the treasures of this ship made their way to the national museum.")



Friday, January 19, 2018

Throwback on Bulong (boo'-long) Marinduque folklore



A compilation of Marinduque's folklores was published in 1914, annotated by Henry Otley Beyer, an American anthropologist and professor at U.P. He spent most of his adult life teaching Philippine indigenous culture and became known as the Father of Philippine Anthropology.


Beyer's compilation of Marinduque folklores included stories on folk beliefs and cultural practices that prevailed on the island. It was our inspiration for the staging of "Bulong". Pronounced boo'-long (not bu-long' the Tagalog word for 'whisper'). Bulong is defined as the collective name of spirits that transport humans bodily into another place or dimension. Often on this island, old folks have endless stories to tell about them based on personal experiences.

In 2002, this blogger upon request of the mayor of Gasan for assistance in conceptualizing their first "Araw ng Gasan" celebration thought of staging a dance-drama titled 'Bulong' among other events. Belief in the spirit world and ancestral worship was of course, the order of the day when Gasan was 'discovered' by the Spaniards centuries before introduction of Christianity. 



"Bulong", written and directed by this blogger was thus a re-shaping of those traditional stories, presenting bits and pieces of historical data to help today's generation get inspired and to perhaps serve as a vehicle for reflection by those who dwell on this stuff. It has since been presented in all of Marinduque's six municipalities as part of an NCCA-PGM project.

'BULONG' SYNOPSIS:

Teen-aged Salve, catching 'bilabila' (butterflies) finds herself in a half-awake, half dream state and sees strange creatures, the elemental spirits, around her and is at once taken to another world. That's the world of spirits and strange creatures we've all heard about on this island. There she's also brought to a door that leads to the island's prehistory.


Salve encounters 'patianacs' (a kind of scary crow), asuangs, tikbalangs, swaying bamboo trees, duwendes, enkantos.. The elemental Bulong spirits take her to the enkanto until a tug-of-war between the menacing asuangs and friendly spirits ensue, thus saving Salve. The enkantada (known as 'white lady' too), enters and since Salve is a mortal decides to take the girl to the world of those who were once mortals, the world of Salve's ancestors. Here the Katalona of "Mara Unduk" fame is seen still wielding power. Salve becomes witness to the romance and tragedy of the Alon-Baylana-Kidlat (Katutubos), love triangle and its tragic end. She also gets to see the island's Pastores anito for the first time.

Salve sees how intruders from other shores supplanted a new set of beliefs to those of her ancestors by the power of the sword and the cross. As the ancient people cry in protest Salve begins to understand why she was taken there. The elemental spirits free her at last, their mission accomplished.



But the enkanto, so smitten with Salve, gets in the way. He connives with the asuangs and ugly characters for her capture. With no one to save her except herself Salve uses the folk formula to set herself free at last from her new abductors.


Thursday, January 18, 2018

Luma at bagong mga tala pa tungkol sa Marinduque Tagalog, ang 'ugat'

Mt. Malindig 

Galaw-galaw mo, ang Boak Tagalog na kanyang pinag-aralan (na Marinduque Tagalog ngani tulad rin ng mga salitain sa iba pang mga bayan ng islang-lalawigan) ang pinag-ugatan, o isa sa pinag-ugatan ng Tagalog. Ang mga ito'y inasalita pa rin natin ngay-on, at doon pa mismo maririnig ng maliwanag ang mga sinaunang pananalita ng 'ating' ('ating' bilang Filipino, dahil hindi naman taga Marinduque si Lopez, ha, kaya't walang halong panglalansi), ating mga ninuno! Isipa raw maigi!

Luma at bagong mga tala tungkol sa pinagmulan ng Marinduque at tungkol sa Tagalog na sinasalita dito 


Updated version from my old blogsite posted 13 years ago, on February 5, 2005, click here,

The origin of the name, "Marinduque", has been the subject of discussions and thought-provoking conjectures.

Fr. Miguel Bernad in a brief account commented on the origin of the names of a number of places in the Philippines, among which was Marinduque. He said that "Malinduk (or Malindik) is now Marinduque." Explaining that there are provinces, towns and villages whose modern names have been the result of some inability on the part of the Spaniards (or of others), to pronounce the original native name.

F. Arsenio Manuel (of the former National Historical Institute), who conducted a study of place-names, made an interesting one on the origin of 'Marinduque'. He said that 'Marinduque' could not have originated from Malinduk or Malindik but rather from "MALINDUG". 


Malindig means tall and elegant stature, similar to the Visayan term Malindug

This he said, has historical implication, for the word "malindig" which means "tall and elegant stature" in Tagalog has similar if not parallel meaning to the Visayan term "malindug". These were two cognate terms, Manuel wrote in the study, which fittingly describe the island's volcano, Mt. Malindig.

As for the probability that the Visayan term used as basis for naming the mountain and not the Tagalog word, accounts of early Visayan migration to the island would appear to support this view. The Dasmarinas listing of encomiendas in 1751 already spelled Marinduque in this manner, said he. (But I suspected then that Manuel must be Visayan...)

Manuel explained further that the phonetic hispanization of Malindug followed the Spanish phonetic system. Spanish does not tolerate the voiced velar stop "g" in its phonology. In Morga's Sucesos de las Islas Filipinas and other Spanish chronicles for example, the term for 'loincloth' is spelled 'bahaque'. This spelling and its Spanish pronunciation follows Spanish phonetic laws - 'bahag' becoming 'bahaque'.

This change according to Manuel also appears to have happened to "Palanyag" which became "Paranaque", with additional change taking place, the "l" becoming "r", again following Spanish phonetic tendencies. This "l" - "r" 'spin shift' is, of course, also evident in 'Marinduque'.

Hence, the legend of Marinduque as having resulted from the romance of "Marin" and "Duque", the ill-starred lovers of a popular local myth cannot have any value in historical writing nor folklore studies, stated Manuel. This, he opined, was just another instance of 'folk-etymologising'.


In 2002, as a volunteer cultural worker I decided to call the theater group I formed in Buenavista, for that town lies at the foot of the subject volcano. I spent sometime, of course, explaining to the cast (students from the Marinduque Victorian's College), that we owe it to our ancestors to preserve that forgotten name.

The MALINDUG name wasn't new to me, though. I first encountered the same explanation from a research paper given to me by the late Ding Jardiniano of Boac back in 1993, in connection with a play I was writing with the working title, "Saan Nanggaling ang Moryon", that we finally presented as "Moryonan" Isang Baliktanaw." 

The said research paper (there was a dearth of such at that time so we valued anything about Marinduque), was authored by another person (Jardiniano told me then that he knew the guy personally), not Manuel. 

However, in 1997, I happened to attend the Conference on Local History sponsored by the National Historical Institute (NHI) held in Makiling, where Manuel, who was present, freely distributed copies of his work entitled: "Marinduque: A Study of Place Names" - an identical copy of the same document I encountered in 1993. And so I took note to change the name of my source promptly to that of Mr. Manuel. 

(I was aware at that time that the previous author, also from NHI, earlier figured in the loss of the famous Bonifacio trial papers and sale of other historical documents and was promptly jailed. For that reason I decided that he must have been the one who copied Manuel's paper and claimed the work as his. I am also aware that even on this small island-province, this kind of practice happens. Anyway, in 2004Manuel was declared as National Artist for Literature).

Then, in 2000, former Balangaw member (and kindred spirit), Patrick Henry R. Manguera, who decided to take up a Master's Degree in History at the University of the Philippines, after some discussions on our local history, sent me a mimeographed copy of a 1923 (repeat 1923), article on Boak Tagalog, written by a CECILIO LOPEZ, of the University of the Philippines. It gave me a surprise, almost startled by its implications. The said article was reprinted in 1970 also in mimeographed form for distribution.

Eli J. Obligacion, this blogger

Excerpts from the Lopez paper:

"A few words may here be said regarding the derivation of the name Marinduque, a word around which the same kind of regrettable, because superficial and erroneous etymologyzing and inventive story-telling has sprung up which is indulged in, nowadays, by only too many of my countrymen who seem to have allowed themselves to be guided away from that historical sincerity which true patriotism should dictate to them.

'MALINDIG' - not Maring and Duque

"The name in question has nothing to do with a Mary, and a Spanish duke ('duque'), but can be shown to be derived from the name of a high and particularly steep mountain on the island, called Malindig.

"In old chronicles the name of the island occurs in such varying forms as Malinduc, Marinducq, Marinduc, Malindic, and Malindig, forms quite evidently to be analyzed into the well-known 'adjectival' prefix 'ma-' denoting chiefly existence, and a radical word, or stem, occuring in Tagalog as 'lindig', in Bikol as 'lindog' or 'lindug', the second vowel of both forms (i.e. Tag. 'i', Bik. 'o' or 'u'), going back, in accordance with the so-called 'pepet law', to the indistinct vowel 'e'. 

"The change of the first sound of the stem, 'l', to 'r' is likewise in consonance with a common Indonesian phonetic law, while the conversion of final 'g' into the Spanish ending 'que' finds an exact parallel in the case of the town Paranaque on Manila Bay, which in Tagalog is called Palanyag. Note, in this connection, also the fluctuation of the last sound of the name Boac which is given by Buzeta y Bravo (Diccionario geografico de las Islas Filipinas) as 'Boac o Boag'.

"The stem 'lindig occurs, according to Noceda y Sanlucar, in the new obsolete Tagalog word 'maglindig', meaning 'rising up straight so as not to be covered by the water', while for the Bikol form 'lindog' Marcos de Lisboa states quite clearly that it means 'monte muy alto y derecho', both forms embodying thus the idea of English 'steep, towering'."

Lopez is 'Father of Philippine Linguistics'

After further research, I came to know that Cecilio Lopez was known as the 'Father of Philippine Linguistics', and his works have not been squarely contested. I just love and admire Lopez, a non-Marinduqueno. Why? Listen to his expert remarks made after a very thorough study of Boak Tagalog (that's really Marinduque Tagalog), eh?

"When listening to a conversation between people belonging to the speech-group here in question, a native from the country around Manila is likely to receive the impression that Boak Tagalog is simpler, more imperfect form of his own more highly developed speech, an impression comparable to that experienced under similar circumstances by an Englishman, German, or Frenchman, when listening to one of the different dialects spoken in his country. 


'Provincial form of speech'

"We should not forget, however, that although they have followed a different development, such provincial forms of speech have been originally the roots, or among the roots, from which modern national forms have sprung, and that in them may, therefore, be found remnants of the more archaic speech of our forefathers, remnants long forgotten by our modern parlance but nevertheless of great interest to the linguist".

Wala na si Lopez pero mahalaga hindi lamang sa mga mag-aaral ng wika, kundi higit para sa mga taga-Marinduque ang kanyang naisulat. Higit sa lahat. Galaw-galaw mo, ang Boak Tagalog na kanyang pinag-aralan (na Marinduque Tagalog nganin tulad rin ng mga salitan sa ibat-ibang bayan ng islang-lalawigan) ang pinag-ugatan, o isa sa pinag-ugatan ng Tagalog at inasalita pa rin natin ngay-on, at doon pa mismo maririnig ng maliwanag ang mga sinaunang pananalita ng 'ating' ('ating' bilang Filipino, dahil hindi taga Marinduque si Lopez, ha?), mga ninuno! Isipa raw maigi!

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Mas gumanda nang estado ng Elektrisidad sa Marinduque isang taon matapos ang pananalanta ng Bagyong NinaPH

January 2018: Dumating sa Marinduque ang 1.5MW genset na hiniling ni Cong. Lord Allan Velasco sa mga kinauukulan.

Matapos ang mabilis na rehabilitasyon sa Marinduque ng mga nasirang power lines makaraan ang Bagyong Nina noong Disyembre 2016. Naganap ito sa tulong ng Task Force Kapatid (basahin sa ibaba).

Ngayon naman ay karagdagang 1.5MW generator para sa Torrijos Diesel Power Plant ang dumating na sa Marinduque sa tulong ng NPC, Marelco at Pangulong Rodrigo Duterte.

Marinduque, January 13, 2018, si Cong. Lord Allan Velasco ay nag-ulat:
Natutuwa po ako at isa isa ng natutupad ang pinaplano po natin para sa probinsya. Dumating na po ang nirequest nating 1.5MW na generator set na ilalagay po sa Torrijos Diesel Power Plant sa Brgy. Cagpo, Torrijos. Bukod sa pag may nasira sa linya papuntang Torrijos galing Boac ay hindi maapektuhan ang Torrijos, magiging stable ang voltage ng power, at maisasamang mabenepisyuhan dito ang bayan ng Sta. Cruz sa distribusyon ng kuryente.
Maraming maraming salamat sa Napocor, Marelco, at sa ating minamahal na Pangulo!

Torrijos Diesel Power Plant


STATUS OF POWER RESTORATION IN MARINDUQUE AS OF JANUARY 6, 2017

January 2017: Nagsidatingan sa Marinduque ang power crews mula sa ibat-ibang electric cooperatives sa Luzon para tumulong sa rehabilitasyon ng Marinduque matapos ang malakas na bagyo. Hiniling ni Cong. Lord Allan Velasco sa mga kinauukulan.

Patuloy pa rin ang rehabilitation ng mga nasirang linya ng Marelco dahil sa bagyong NINA, at ito ay sabay-sabay na isinasagawa sa anim na bayan ng ating lalawigan sa pamamagitan ng mga tauhan ng Marelco. Prayoridad ang pagsasaayos ng mga nasirang service drop wires upang mapailawan na ang mga kabahayan at iba’t-ibang establisyemento sa poblaciones na 4 na bayan (Boac, Gasan, Buenavista at Mogpog) na may kuryente na. Paghahanda naman para sa pagdating ng kuryente ang layunin ng service dropping na isinasagawa naman ng mga Linemen sa Sta Cruz at Torrijos.
Sa pagdating ng assistance mula sa Central at Southern Luzon sa pamamagitan ng Task Force Kapatid na binubuo ng mga sumusunod:

Pampanga Electric Cooperative I (PELCO I), Pampanga Electric Cooperative II (PELCO II), Tarlac Electric Cooperative I (TARELCO I), Tarlac Electric Cooperative II (TARELCO II), Batangas Electric Cooperative I (BATELCE I), Batangas Electric Cooperative II (BATELEC II), Romblon Electric Cooperative (ROMELCO).

Pag-uukulan naman ng prayoridad ang backbone lines papuntang Sta Cruz at Torrijos upang makumpleto na ang restoration sa 6 anim na bayan.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Ngani? Mandin naman! Wikang Marinduque pa more! (Marinduque 'patwa')

Resulta ng larawan para sa marinduque rising

Marinduque Patois 

Marinduque is less than 100 miles from Manila as the crow flies, or about a day-long trip if, you take the RoRo in Lucena. This is by way of car Manila via SLEX, then the Friendship Highway to Lucena and on to Dalahican Port. The ship weighs anchor at either Balanacan Port, Mogpog; Buyabod Port, Santa Cruz; or Masiga Pier, Gasan, town where the airport is also located.

Yet for all its closeness, Marinduque Tagalog (MT) seems dissimilar to Luzon Tagalog (LT) in intonation, grammar, and words.

Dr. Rosa Pelaez Soberano's informative and scholarly study on the island-province's funny-sounding jargon entitled "The dialects of Marinduque Tagalog," puts the proper perspective in this seeming conundrum; why is MT so unlike LT although the two areas are near each other.

The version of Tagalog spoken in Marinduque has been described as "the root from which modern national forms of speech have sprung," where remnants of archaic Tagalog can be found, spoken in a lilting manner by its inhabitants. If this linguistic theory is accurate, Marinduque's Tagalog has contributed significantly to the development of the official Philippine national language, according to Wikipedia.

It added that to this day, Marinduqueños speak an old variation of the Tagalog language that is very close to the way Tagalog was spoken before the Spanish colonization. According to language experts, the Tagalog dialects of Marinduque are the most divergent, especially the Eastern Marinduque dialect, perhaps due to the relative isolation from the Tagalogs of Luzon and also perhaps due to the influence of the Visayan and Bicol migrants.

Linguist Christopher Sundita observed that some of the affixes in Marinduque Tagalog, particularly "a-" and "ina-," are affixes used in Asi (Bantoanon), a Visaya language spoken in Romblon, just south of Marinduque. Example: "a-patayin ta," (I will kill you), pronounced with an ascending pitch, or "ina-biro mo wari ako," (It seems you are kidding me).

Marinduque Tagalog, like the Tagalog spoken over two centuries ago, had an additional verb category, the imperative, which was used for commands and requests (e.g., Matulog ka na - Go to sleep).

Wikipedia says that "even then, the imperative and the infinitive were used side by side in expressing commands; but in standard Tagalog, apparently the infinitive became used exclusively. And in the Eastern Marinduque dialect, the imperative affixes are very much alive."

One has to hear the Marinduque Tagalog spoken to appreciate what this means. Or, to follow Soberano's example, by reading some of the 300-item list of words she compiled, along with guide to their pronunciation in order to hear or feel the resonant sound of the natives.

According to Soberano, the Tagalog dialects of Marinduque are more similar to each other than they are to Manila Tagalog.


"When a native of Marinduqe speaks, another native listener can readily tell the dialect area from which the speaker hails. His speech is marked by a characteristic intonation, the presence or absence of non-phrase-final glottal stop, a few items of different vocabulary and morphological structures." - Manila Bulletin, December 6, 2012 

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Marinduque bilang lugar na pinag-ugatan ng Wikang Tagalog; Linguistic Atlas ng Pilipinas

Para sa mga nagtatanong at gustong malaman kung ano ang turing sa ibat-ibang bersiyon ng wikang TAGALOG na sinasalita sa MARINDUQUE, narito ang kopya ng Linguistic Atlas ng Pilipinas kung saan nakatala ang lahat ng mga wika sa ibat-ibang panig ng Pilipinas. Ang Tagalog na sinasalita sa Marinduque ay maingat na pinag-aralan at napagpasyahan ayon sa nasabing pag-aaral, na katangi-tanging wikang pinag-ugatan ng modernong pambansang anyo ng ating wika. Ito ang sinaunang Tagalog na nagpakayabong na ngayon bilang salitang Filipino. 

Taong 1914 pa pinag-aralan ni Cecilio Lopez, tinaguriang Father of Philippine Linguistics ang natuklasang ito. Pag-aaral na muling inilimbag ng Institute of Philippine Linguistics noong 1973, at wala pang sinumang humamon sa pag-aaral na ito hanggang sa kasalukuyang panahon.



Source ng Linguistic Atlas ng Pilipinas: National Commission for Culture & the Arts (NCCA).

Friday, January 12, 2018

"Gintong Binhi": Sining at Kultura sa MIMAROPA



(Salin sa Filipino ng isa sa pinakabinabasang artikulo sa Marinduque Rising blog)

 Ang MIMAROPA (acronym para sa Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, Palawan), ay nilikha noong 2002 ng Executive Order No. 103 na humati sa Region IV (Southern Tagalog), sa kinilalang Rehiyon IV-A (Calabarzon), at IV-B (Mimaropa). Kaya’t ito ang isa sa pinakabatang rehiyon sa Pilipinas.

Sa likod nito, alam natin na ang pinakamatandang kalansay ng tao sa Pilipinas ay natagpuan sa Palawan (ang Tabon Man), na sakop ng MIMAROPA. Mayroon ding naganap na mga katulad na paghahanap sa mga kuweba sa Marinduque noong dekada ng 1960. Kaya’t MIMAROPA pa rin ang masasabing pinakamatandang rehiyon sa usaping arkeolohiya ng Pilipinas.

Ito ang rehiyong kung saan ang Tagalog din ay malawakang ginagamit, bahagi ang Mimaropa ng Luzon ngunit nakahiwalay ang mga islang-lalawigan na bumubuo dito.

Bago dumating ang 2002 ang rehiyon ay tinatawag na Southern Tagalog Region na binubuo ng 11 lalawigan at 7 lungsod. Ang mga lalawigang nasa katimugang Luzon ay kinilala naman bilang CALABARZON tulad ng nasabi
Ang inisyatiba na lumikha ng isang hiwalay na rehiyon para sa limang islang-lalawigan ng Luzon ay sadyang nagmula sa mga nasabing isla. Nadama noon na ang pagiging malapit ng Calabarzon sa Maynila, ang sentro ng kapangyarihan, ay naglalagay sa mga taga-isla sa isang malaking kahinaan lalo na sa usaping pananalapi.

Pinaniniwalaan noon na ang Calabarzon ang higit na nakakakuha ng malaking bahagi ng pondo para sa mga proyektong may kinalaman sa pang-ekonomiyang pag-unlad, at maliit na bahagi naman ang dumarating sa mga islang-lalawigan. Kaya ang Mimaropa ay naging isang hiwalay na grupo ng mga isla. Gayunpaman, sa pakikipagtulungan sa pagpapaunlad ng turismo sa rehiyon, nanatiling maganda ang tulungan sa pagitan ng Calabarzon at Mimaropa.

Sining at Kultura sa MIMAROPA.
Ang pagiging sinauna ng Mimaropa at pagiging tahanan ng mga katutubo ay mamamalas sa mga Mangyan na naninirahan sa isla ng Mindoro (pitong iba't ibang wika ang umiiral dito: Irava, Alangan, Tambuid, Hanunuo, Tadyawan, Buhid at Ratagnon).

Sa Palawan naman ay maraming mga katutubo: Cuyonon & Agutayon, itinuturing na pangunahing etnikong grupo ng lalawigan; Ang mga grupo ng Muslim tulad ng Molbog, Jama Mapun at Tausug ay naninirahan sa katimugang baybayin ng Palawan; Tagbanuas ang pinakamalaking indigenous group na nakatira sa gitnang bahagi; May mas maliit pang mga kultural na mga komunidad tulad ng Pala'wan, Taut bato, Batak, Ken-uy at Kalamian.

Sa Romblon, dahil malapit sa Visayas ay may tatlong pangunahing wika, Romblomanon, Asi at Onhan na itinuturing na kabilang sa pamilya ng wikang Bisaya.

Marinduque ay walang ibang katutubong mga grupo maliban sa mga Tagalog, ngunit maraming mga inapo ng Asi tribe ang naninirahan sa timog bahagi ng isla at sila ay kilala pa rin na kumakapit sa kanilang mga pinag-ugatan sa Banton. Ang Tagalog na sinasalita sa Marinduque ay maingat na pinag-aralan at napagpasyahan ayon sa pag-aaral, na wikang pinag-ugatan ng mga modernong pambansang anyo ng pagsasalita – ang dating Tagalog na yumabong na bilang salitang Filipino. Taong 1914 pa pinag-aralan ito ni Cecilio Lopez, tinaguriang Father of Philippine Linguistics. Pag-aaral na muling inilimbag ng Institute of Philippine Linguistics noong 1973, at wala pang sinumang humamon sa pag-aaral hanggang sa kasalukuyang panahon.

Culture & Arts Council
Sa bagay na may kinalaman sa mga konseho ng sining sa ibat-ibang lugar sa Mimaropa, ang NCCA at DILG ay walang mga nakalimbag na listahan mula sa rehiyong ito. Nagkaroon ng mga pagtatangka na magtatag ng mga konseho ng sining sa ilang mga lugar sa ibat-ibang panahon, ngunit sa sandaling may pagbabago sa lokal na gobyerno at pamumuno sa lalawigan o sa mga munisipyo, ang mga plano at programa ng mga konseho ng sining ay naaapektuhan. Base sa karanasan, ang mga pagsisikap na ito ay maaaring tuluyang naglalaho.

Mga naging unang hakbangin sa pagpapaunlad ng sining at kultura sa rehiyon:


ORIENTAL MINDORO
Isang organisasyon sa Oriental Mindoro ay nagsasama ng mga salitang Kultura at Sining sa pangalan nito: ang Sangguniang Panlalawigan ng Lungsod ng Bongabon, Kultura at Sining. Kabilang sa mga naging proyekto nito ay ang a) pagtatanim ng mga pandekorasyon na halaman sa Strong Republic National Highway sa loob ng bayan; b) pagdaraois ng isang Lantern Festival sa Disyembre. c) pagpanukala ng floating restaurant sa Sucol River.

Hindi sinasabi rito na ang mga bagay na nauukol sa pagsulong ng kultura at sining ay napapabayaan sa ibang mga lugar ng lalawigan. Ang Oriental Mindoro ay may 14 na munisipalidad at 1 lungsod, at ang lahat ng mga lugar na ito, sa mga nakaraang taon, ay nagawang magbuo ng kanilang sariling mga kapistahan upang ipakita ang kanilang kultura at sining. Ang mga naturang festival ay naghihikayat na maging malikhain ang mga mamamayan sa mga programang pang-sining at kultura.  Nagresulta ito sa ibat-ibang festival tulad ng "Mahalta", "Bansudani", "Sulyog", "Bahaghari", "Biniray", at "Sanduguan".

Nagaganap ang mga ito sa pamamagitan ng pagsasama-sama sa LGU's kung saan ang munisipal na konseho ng turismo ang nangunguna. Ang mga konseho ng turismo, sa kabilang banda, ay binubuo ng mga kinatawan ng ibat-ibang sektor na maaaring kabilang ang impormal na grupong pangkultura.


Sa Lungsod ng Calapan isang "City Museum" ang inilagay sa kanilang city hall upang ipakita ang makulay na kasaysayan ng Lungsod. Isang Espesyal na Programa naman para sa Sining (SPA), ang naging proyekto ng DepEd sa pakikipagtulungan ng JJ Leido National High School.
May mga outreach programs/workshops din na idinaraos sa ibat-ibang panahon . Ang mga munisipalidad tulad ng Pinamalayan naman ay nagsasagawa ng mga programang sinimulan ng lokal na Ani ng Sining.

OCCIDENTAL MINDORO
Ganito rin ang nagaganap sa Occidental Mindoro. Ang mga konseho ng Turismo ay umiiral sa 9 sa 15 munisipalidad ng Occidental Mindoro. Dito idinaos halimbawa ang isang mahalagang pagho-host ng Kapulungang Konseho ng Turismo sa Southern Tagalog sa San Jose noong 2009, kung saan ipinamalas sa lahat ang kultura at sining ng lalawigan. Ang lugar ng pagtitipon ay naidaos pa sa 7107 Islands Cruise Ship.

dugoy fiest
Dugoy Festival, Occidental Mindoro

San San Jose at sa Sablayan ng mga susunod na taon ay naging inspirado ang mga komunidad para simulan ang higit na pagbibigay halaga sa kanilang minanang kultura sa pamamagitan ng mga exhibits, at pagdaos ng street dancing. Litaw ang pagbibigay diin sa mga gawaing bayanihan lalo na sa pagtatanim at pag-aani (Saknungan sa San Jose at Dugoy Festival naman sa Sablayan na pakikiisa ng ibat-ibang kultura sa mga Sablayenos ang tema), 

Unang MIMAROPA Arts & Culture Summit na ginanap sa Marinduque
MARINDUQUE
Sa Marinduque, mayroong isang pagtatangka noong 1998, na itatag ang "Sining Marinduque", sa tulong ng Sentrong Pangkultura ng Pilipinas (Cultural Center of the Philippines), kung saan ang mga kinatawan ng ibat-ibang sector sa buong lalawigan ay inanyayahan.  Ngunit hindi tama ang tiyempo. Pagkalipas ng ilang buwan matapos ang national at local elections,  nagkaroon ng pagbabago sa panlalawigang pangangasiwa at namatay ang konseho.

Ngunit ang munisipalidad ng Gasan ay nagpasya na magpatuloy sa gawaing ito. Nagtatag dito ng isang Gasan Culture & Arts Foundation (GASCUAF), noong 2001, kasama ang Mayor ng Gasan bilang CEO. Ang iba't ibang mga kultural na proyekto ay isinagawa hanggang makilala ang Gasan sa bansag na ‘cultural nerve-center ng Marinduque’. Ang isa sa maraming mga naging proyekto ay ang pagpapakilala ng "Gasang-Gasang Easter Festival" na naging isang pinakahihintay na taunang pagdiriwang.

Resulta ng larawan para sa gasang gasang festival
Muling nagkaroon ng pagbabago sa munisipal na pamumuno pagkatapos ng 3 taong termino ng mga local na opisyal. Ang pagdiriwang na nabanggit ay hindi ginanap sa susunod na dalawang taon. Sa ikatlong taon, nang walang pakikipagtulungang ibinigay ang bagong alkalde, tinangka ng GASCUAF na idaos ang pagdiriwang sa tulong ng iba't ibang mga kalahok mula sa mga barangay.

Isang kakatwang pangyayari8 ang naganap. Ang mga tinaguriang ‘infraboys’ sa utos ng alkalde ay dali-daling nagtayo ng isang pansamantalang bakod sa bawat posibleng entry point sa paligid ng isang pampublikong parke, yari sa kawayan at madre de cacao. Minabuti na lamang ng mga organizers na makahanap ng isang alternatibong lugar sa isang pasilidad ng DepEd, subalit hindi pinahintulutan ang paggamit ng mga elementary school grounds. Kaya ang mga street-dancers at publiko, para matuloy lamang ang pinaghandaang festival ay nakuntento na lamang na idaos ang festival sa isang pribadong lote na dalawang kilometro ang layo mula sa sentro ng bayan - sa isang malawak na open space "sa paligid ng niyugan". Ang mga tao ay nagsidatingan tulad ng inaasahan para manood at ipakita ang kanilang pagsuporta. Nang napalitan ang namumuno, unang ginawa ng bagong Sangguniang Bayan ng Gasan ang pagpasa ng isang Ordinansa na nagpapatibay sa "Gasang-Gasang Easter Festival" bilang opisyal na pagdiriwang ng Gasan.

Resulta ng larawan para sa viva marinduque ncca
"VIVA MARINDUQUE!"

Samantala, ang pamahalaang panlalawigan ng Marinduque, sa ilalim ng isang bagong administrasyon, bilang suporta sa programang pang-turismo at pangkultura nito, ay lumagda sa isang MOA kasama ang NCCA para sa pagdaraos ng mga proyektong may kinalaman sa Philippine Arts Festival. Kabilang dito ang paglibot sa buong lalawigan ng mga lokal na grupo ng kultura para magtanghal sa anim na bayan ng Marinduque. Bahagi ang mga bayan sa pagtatanghal ng kanilang cultural showcase sa naging matagumpay na proyektong tinawag na "Viva Marinduque" "(Ani ng Sining).

Ang Sangguniang Panlalawigan ng Marinduque naman ay nagdaos ng kauna-unahang "Araw ng Marinduque", bilang venue para sa mga pangsining at kulturang gawain. Isang ordinansa para sa pag-aampon ng Pebrero 21 bilang "Araw ng Marinduque", ang naipasa na tumutugma naman sa pagdiriwang ng National Arts Month.

Sa pakikipagtulungan sa mga programang outreach ng CCP ay naimbitahan din ang "Sining Kambayoka" mula sa Marawi City, naidaos ang isang Cinemalaya Festival, at mga kaukulang workshop na may kaugnayan naman sa sayaw at paggawa ng pelikula.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Biniray Festival ng Romblon, alay sa Sto. Nino.
ROMBLON
Ang Romblon ay kilala sa tradisyonal na paghabi at paggawa ng basket. Ang mga handicraft ay isang pangunahing industriya kung saan ang mga kababaihan ay nakikibahagi. Ang mga lokal na artisano ay kilala sa kanilang mahusay na gawaing kahoy. Halimbawa, ang Katedral ng San Jose ay nagtatampok ng gawaing kahoy na ginawa ng mga lokal na artisan dito.

Ang "Biniray Festival" sa Romblon ay isang siyam na araw na pangyayari tuwing Enero na bantog bilang isang napakasayang festival ng pagsasayaw at itinatag bilang collaborative na pagsisikap ng pamahalaan at ng lokal na simbahan bilang pagpugay sa Sto. Nino..

Ang isang espesyal na programa para sa Sining (SPA), ay sinimulan din ng DepEd sa Looc National High School kung saan ang mga mag-aaral ay sumasailalim sa pagsasanay sa pag-awit at pagsasayaw.

PALAWAN
Sa Palawan, mayroong "Sining sa Kalinangan ng Palawan". Ito ay isang sangay ng Palawan Craft Program ng pamahalaang panlalawigan. Ang programa ay nilikha noong 2002 ngunit noong Mayo 2006, ang espasyo para sa isang pasilidad ay itinatag sa provincial capitol building para magamit ng Sining.. Ang espasyo ay ginagamit na ngayon bilang isang multi-media cultural library at mumunting palabas para sa tradisyunal na mga bagay mula sa Palawan. Sa disenyo ng programa ay may dalawang mahahalagang elemento:

1). Upang magbigay ng edukasyon at outreach sa lahat ng mga naninirahan sa Palawan sa kahalagahan ng kultura sa pagpapaunlad ng Palawan, 2) Upang hikayatin ang pagtatatag ng kultura at sining na konseho sa lahat ng 23 munisipyo sa Palawan.

Sa ngayon, ang proyektong ito ay nagtagumpay sa pagkuha ng ilan sa mga visual arts ng mga Indigenous Peoples of Palawan na ipinapakita naman sa ilang mga lugar sa capitol building. Ang diorama ng 8-piraso na may kasamang teksto tungkol sa mga katutubo ng Palawan ay matatagpuan din sa kapitolyo.

Isa namang Kalinawa Art Foundation na naglalayong itaguyod ang pagpapaunlad ng visual arts sector ng mga indibidwal ang nakikipagtulungan din sa mga kaukulang proyekto sa Palawan bagama't ito ay nakabatay sa Makati City. Ang "Taunang Indigenous People's Visual Art Show" sa Puerto Princesa City ang isa sa mga naging proyekto.

Baragatan Festival, Palawan. Tungkol naman sa pagkakaisa ng Palawan
para sa pagkatatag ng kanilang pamahalaan noong 1905.
Sa sayaw, ang "Sining Palawan Dance Troupe" ang opisyal na dance troupe ng Palawan State University ay may record ng mga palabas sa iba't ibang mga rehiyon kasama na ang mga pagtatanghal sa San Francisco, California noong 2007.

Paminsan-minsan ang Pamahalaan ng Puerto Princesa City ay nakikipagtulungan sa CCP para sa mga proyekto ng Outreach sa mga palabas at mga pang-kulturang workshop.

SAMAKATUWID:
Sa iba't ibang antas samakatuwid, ang kultura at sining ay buhay sa Mimaropa. Ang kawalan ng mga konseho ng sining sa maraming lugar, na dulot ng ibat-ibang natatanging mga sitwasyon kada lugar, mula sa kakulangan ng mga pinagkukunan ng pondo hanggang sa interbensyon o panliligalig pampulitika sa ilang lugar, ay hindi pa rin kayang pahintuin ang mga aktibidad pangkultura at artistiko. Bagaman ito ay hindi isang pangkalahatang tuntunin, lumalabas na mas madaling maisaayos ang mga konseho sa mga mas urbanized na lugar - kung saan naroon ang pera. Gayunpaman, ang mga malalaking sponsors sa mga lugar na ito ay nakakaranas din ng tinatawag na donor fatigue. Sa mas maliliit na bayan, ang mga ito ay nananatiling hamon.

"GINTONG BINHI"
Ang 1st MIMAROPA Arts & Culture Summit sa Marinduque bilang bahagi ng NCCA Institutional Promotion in the Region
"Gintong Binhi", ang 1st Mimaropa Arts & Culture Forum, ay isang naging venue para sa pagsulong ng mga programa ng NCCA sa rehiyon. Ito ay mapabuti o i-refresh ang mga kasanayan sa mga konseho ng sining at mga organisasyon sa Program Development, Project Management, & Paggawa ng Panukala; magtatag ng mga mesa ng NCCA sa mga LGU, mga paaralan, at mga institusyong kultural; palakasin ang pakikipagtulungan ng LGU-NCCA sa pag-promote ng sining at pangkultura at ayusin ang adhoc ng Regional Arts & Culture Network sa rehiyon.

(Nota: Unang naipost ang artikulong ito sa Ingles noong 2010. Sa loob ng nakaraang pitong taon ay naging mas masigla at naging mayabong pa ang mga gawaing pangsining at pangkultura sa Mimaropa, tatalakayin sa susunod na pagkakataon).

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Cong. Lord Allan Velasco pushes for passage of Local Bills



Congressman Lord Allan Jay Q. Velasco of the Lone District of Marinduque, authored House Bill No. 6071, entitled “An Act Providing for the Establishment of TESDA Provincial Training Center, Marinduque and Appropriating Funds Therefore” and House Bill No. 6038, entitled “An Act Declaring May 3 of Every Year a Special Nonworking Holiday in the Municipality of Sta. Cruz, Province of Marinduque, In Commemoration of its Founding Anniversary, to be known as Sta. Cruz Day.”

Velasco recognizes the important contribution of the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) in preparing Marinduqueños for employment opportunities, locally and abroad. Popular TESDA courses offered in Marinduque includes household service, massage tutorials, electrical installation and maintenance training, and baking tutorials. 

Also with the support of MATA Partylist Rep. Tricia Nicole Velasco-Catera, H.B. No. 6071 was passed by the Committee on Higher and Technical Education last December 11, 2017.

Congressman Lord Allan Velasco

On the other hand, House Bill No. 6038, which sought to institutionalize the celebration of the people of Sta. Cruz of their beloved municipality’s Foundation Day every 3rd of May, was approved on 3rd reading last December 4, 2017.

With its successful passage in the House of Representatives, it is hoped that the “Sta. Cruz Day” bill will be passed by the Senate and be signed into law by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte by 2018.

Philippines Marinduque Moriones Festival
The three-centuries old Church of Sta. Cruz, Marinduque, built in 1760. Photo: ederic

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Susong Dalaga Hill
Susong Dalaga Hill from Bagtasan isthmus

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Quick news, photos, videos, culture, tourism, history and all that there is on the island of Marinduque, Philippines. "VIVA MARINDUQUE!" www.marinduquegov.blogspot.com

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